U.S. Lacey Act

United States Lacey Act

The United States has become the first country in the world to place an outright, criminally enforceable ban on the import of illegally harvested timber, addressing this issue both nationally and internationally from the demand side. Illegal logging and the international trade in illegal timber has been recognized as a major global problem in environmental, social and economic terms particularly for timber-producing countries of the developing world. It causes environmental damage, costs governments billions of dollars in lost revenue, promotes corruption, undermines the rule of law and good governance and funds armed conflict. Consumer countries contribute to these problems by importing timber and wood products without ensuring that they are legally sourced.

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Intergenerational Equity and Sustainability

Intergenerational Equity and Sustainability

Emilio Padilla June 2001

This paper explores the limitations of conventional economic analysis of intergenerational problems and examines some of the alternatives suggested in the literature. It is argued that proper consideration of future generations has at least three requirements. First, when future costs and benefits are considered, it should be taken into account that they are to be enjoyed by different generations. Second, the sustainability requirement should be adopted. This represents an equity commitment to the future and implies the recognition that future generations have the right to non-deteriorated ecological and economic capacity. The paper studies the ways in which the recognition of these rights might be incorporated into economic evaluation and management. Third, an appropriate institutional network to enforce the recognition of these rights in decision-making processes should be constituted. Its design and necessary functions are also analyzed.

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On the Social Representations of Intergenerational Equity

On the Social Representations of Intergenerational Equity

JULIA M. PUASCHUNDER August 2011

The 2008/09 World Financial Crisis’ impact on economic markets, internationalfinancial policies and society is indubitable. Caused by the neglect of social responsibilityechoing in global financial markets, the world economy has weakened since August 2008.The crisis caused what Alan Greenspan called a ‘once in a century credit tsunami’ featuringgovernmental takeovers and corporate bailouts, a lock-up of credit markets and inter-bank lending, a 25 percent drop in financial market indices, bailed-out European countries and aeconomically-hampered US government (Duchac, 2008). The announcement of therecapitalization of the finance sector in October 2008 halted liberalization trends andperpetuated skepticism and mistrust in unregulated markets (Gangl, Kastlunger, Kirchler &Voracek, 2012).

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​Intergenerational Equity?

​​Intergenerational Equity?

Adelaide Chen April 2012

Climate Expert Tells Planners a Warmer Earth Will Impact Descendents

A climate expert this week urged the nation’s urban and regional planners to help slow global warming, as the levels of greenhouse gas emissions continue to trend upward. Dr. Andrew Weaver, a lead author of a United Nations report on climate change, addressed several thousand members of the American Planning Association in his opening keynote speech on Sunday at the organization’s national conference in Los Angeles. “It is so important that planning organizations in America and elsewhere in the world get engaged,” said the University of Victoria professor to the audience, “because you are setting the infrastructure and policies in place for the generations of tomorrow.”

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Expert Panel on Intergenerational Solidarity

Expert Panel on Intergenerational Solidarity

United Nations May 2013

Intergenerational solidarity and justice is deeply embedded in the concept of sustainable development. Yet many questions remain to be answered. How to define the needs and rights of future generations? What are the duties of current generation to future generations? What can we do to institutionalize the protection of the needs and rights of future generations? A proposal was on the table at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) for the establishment of an Ombudsperson, or High Commissioner, for Future Generations, which gained support from several Member States as well as the Advisory Group on International Environmental Governance. The outcome of Rio+20 kept a space open to continue relevant discussions by inviting the Secretary-General to present a report on intergenerational solidarity, taking into account the needs of future generations, for the achievement of sustainable development.

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